Strategic Planning

Diagnostic Imaging

This is the Diagnostic Imaging Content Page.

Radiology

The Department of Medical Imaging provides a full range of imaging and therapeutic services to the Hospital and community including General Radiology, Fluoroscopy, Ultrasound, BMD, Mammography & OBSP . The Department of Medical Imaging performs18,000 exams per year. Referring physicians typically make the initial request for a diagnostic imaging procedure by submitting a requisition for a diagnostic procedure.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is located in the Diagnostic Imaging Department located on the Ground floor of the hospital (beside the Gift Shop).

Please park in the back parking lot and enter through Entrance D.  If you require an accessible entrance, please enter through the emergency department.

613-623-3166 x214.

Hours of Service:

8 a.m - 4 p.m. Monday - Friday

Guidelines Prior to Ultrasound, if you have questions please ask your family doctor or call the Diagnostic Imaging Department

NOTE: 

We do NOT perform vascular studies on patients with previous stents/bypass graft surgery in legs, Arm Arterial studies or Aorto-Iliac studies.


 Abdomen–  Do not eat or drink for 6 hours prior to exam.


Abdomen & Pelvis or Kidney& Pelvis –Do not eat for 6 hours prior to exam.  A full bladder is required.  1 ½ hours prior to your exam, void and then drink 4-6 glasses of water.  Finish drinking 1 hour before your appointment time. DO NOT VOID


Pelvis or Pregnancy- A full bladder is required.  1 ½ hours prior to your exam, void and then drink 4-6 glasses of water. 

Finish drinking 1 hour before your appointment time. DO NOT VOID


Pregnancy after 18 weeks -A full bladder is required.  1 ½ hours prior to your exam, void and then drink 2-3 glasses of water.  

Finish drinking 1 hour before your appointment time. DO NOT VOID


Carotid Doppler -  If previous studies were not performed by ADMH, previous reports must be sent to ensure proper reporting.


Peripheral Leg Arterial Doppler - If previous studies were not performed by ADMH, previous reports must be sent to ensure proper reporting.


 

 


 

 


 

 

Mammography

Diagnostic Imaging Mammography and Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP)

Service Description and Population Served

Population
Provides mammography services on an outpatient basis to individuals from Renfrew County, Mississippi Mills and West Carleton Ward 5. A video produced by the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation about Mammograms can be found here

Service
Mammography is an imaging technology that uses low dost x-rays to provide pictures of the internal structures of the breast. The mammography and ultrasound services provide a method for investigating possible breast abnormalities including breast cancer. The digital mammography units and the program have been accredited by the Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR).

The Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) was implemented in Arnprior at the Arnprior & District Memorial Hospital in July 2007. The OBSP program provides routine screening mammography services to patients who qualify for the program. The OBSP program also permits patients over the age of 50 to self-refer, which benefits those who do not have a family doctor.

Health Care Team
Medical Radiation Technologists (MRT’s) are specially trained personnel. All MRT’s are registered members of the College of Medical Radiation Technologists of Ontario (CMRTO), which is a requirement to be eligible to work in Ontario.  MRTs perform the mammography examination(s) and test results are interpreted by a radiologist. In order for the mammography program to remain accredited, the MRTs and radiologists must participate in ongoing continuing education related to mammography.

Interdependencies with Other Programs/Health Service Providers/Resources

Other Programs
The mammography service provides screening mammography and is utilized in conjunction with ultrasound for follow up breast assessment. Breast lesion localization is performed with mammography guidance prior to scheduled operative procedures (same day service). The localization aids the surgeon in finding the lesion during the operative procedure.

External HSPs
Physicians who refer their patients for mammography procedures rely on the test results when developing treatment plans.  The radiologist, mammography technologist and ultrasound sonographer work as a team to assess the area of concern.  Pathology testing (biopsy specimens, for example) is referred to a regional center.

Accreditation
Arnprior Regional Health was surveyed by the Mammography Accreditation Program and has been accredited for January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2016. For more information regarding accreditation please click here.

 

 

 

Ontario Breast Screening Program

 

The Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) is a comprehensive, organized breast cancer-screening program. Its mission is to reduce mortality from breast cancer by delivering high quality breast screening to Ontario women between the ages of 50 and 74. OBSP has been in operation since 1990. It is operated by Cancer Care Ontario and funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

Arnprior & District Memorial Hospital offers the Ontario Breast Screening Program in the Diagnostic Imaging Department (Xray) on Monday and Wednesday. All you need to book an appointment is your health card. You do not need a referral from your doctor.

All breast screening technicians are female. The OBSP screens women 50 years of age and over and automatically recalls clients until the age of 74. Clients over the age of 74 are encouraged to consult with their family physician about continued screening. Call today 613-623-7962 x359

A video produced by the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation about Mammograms can be found here

 

Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) - Frequently Asked Questions

When should women get screened for breast cancer?

The Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) recommends that women aged 50 to 74 years who are at average risk for breast cancer have a screening mammogram every two years. Women aged 30 to 69 years who have been identified as being at high risk for breast cancer should have a screening mammogram and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) every year.

To learn more about the OBSP, visit http://www.cancercare.on.ca/pcs/screening/breastscreening/OBSP.

Who is eligible for screening through the OBSP?

The OBSP screens two groups of women:

Ontario women at average risk for breast cancer who are 50 to 74* years of age and have:

  • no acute breast symptoms
  • no personal history of breast cancer
  • no current breast implants
  • They have a genetic mutation that puts them at high risk for breast cancer.
  • They have declined genetic testing, and have a parent, sibling or child with a genetic mutation that puts them at high risk for breast cancer.
  • They have a family history that indicates a lifetime risk of breast cancer that is greater or equal to 25 percent confirmed through genetic assessment.
  • They received radiation therapy to the chest as a treatment for another cancer or condition (e.g., Hodgkin’s lymphoma) before 30 years of age and at least eight years ago.
  • inviting women to participate in screening
  • reminding participants when it is time for their next screening test
  • notifying participants of screening results
  • tracking participants throughout screening processes
  • evaluating program quality and performance
  • avoid alcohol or have no more than one alcoholic drink per day
  • limit their time on hormone replacement therapy, if used, and talk with their family doctor or nurse practitioner before making any medication changes
  • maintain a healthy body weight, especially after menopause
  • be physically active as part of everyday life
  • get screened—regular mammograms, generally every two years, are one way most women aged 50 to 74 years can protect themselves from dying of breast cancer

 

*Women over age 74 can be screened within the OBSP; however, they are encouraged to make a personal decision about breast cancer screening in consultation with their healthcare provider, and will need a referral from their healthcare provider in order to obtain a mammogram. The OBSP will not recall women over age 74 to participate in the program. There is no high-quality scientific evidence to support screening mammography in women over 74 years of age.

 

Ontario women at high risk for breast cancer aged 30 to 69 years who have a referral from their physician, have no acute breast symptoms and fall into one of the following risk categories:

How can women arrange for screening through the OBSP?

Women aged 50 to 74 years who are at average risk for breast cancer can book their own appointments or be referred by a family doctor or nurse practitioner.

Women aged 30 to 69 years who think they may be at high risk for breast cancer need a referral from a physician, based on their family or medical history.

Women who have already been screened at an OBSP site are reminded by letter when they are due for their next screening appointment until they turn 74 years of age. No additional referral is needed.

Women over 74 years of age may undergo mammography screening in the OBSP, however they require a referral from their healthcare provider.

Women can find the nearest OBSP site by calling 1-800-668-9304 or visiting http://www.cancercare.on.ca/pcs/screening/breastscreening/locations.   Screening is available at the Arnprior & District Memorial Hospital 613-623-7962 x359

What is a mammogram?

A mammogram is an X-ray of the breast that is used for screening.

Should women in their 40s who are at average risk for breast cancer be screened?

The OBSP does not screen women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer with mammography.

A greater reduction in risk of death from breast cancer is seen with mammography for screening women at average risk aged 50 to 74 years than among similar women aged 40 to 49 years.

Women in their 40s are encouraged to make a personal decision about breast cancer screening in consultation with their family doctor or nurse practitioner.

At what age should breast cancer screening be stopped?

The OBSP recommends that women at average risk for breast cancer aged 50 to 74 years be screened every two years for breast cancer. Women over age 74 are encouraged to make a personal decision about breast cancer screening in consultation with their family doctor or nurse practitioner.

The OBSP recommends that women aged 30 to 69 years identified as being at high risk for breast cancer get screened every year for breast cancer with mammography and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (or screening ultrasound, if appropriate). Between the ages of 70 and 74 years, the OBSP recommends that women at high risk for breast cancer be screened with mammography only each year. Women over age 74 are encouraged to make a personal decision about breast cancer screening in consultation with their family doctor or nurse practitioner.

How many women at average risk get screened through the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP)?

In 2013–2014, approximately 1.3 million Ontario women aged 50 to 74 years old were screened for breast cancer with a mammogram. This represents a participation rate of 65 per cent among the 2 million women who were eligible for screening.

Of the women who were screened, the proportion participating through the OBSP has increased from 58 per cent in 2006–2007 to 79 per cent (1,024,166) in 2013–2014. In 2015, 595,985 mammograms were performed on average risk women in the OBSP.

Women are encouraged to get screened through the OBSP because as an organized screening program it offers important benefits, such as:

How can I reduce my risk of breast cancer?

A healthy lifestyle can reduce the risk of breast cancer. Women should:

Are there any harm associated with breast cancer screening?

Mammograms may miss some breast cancers and some cancers develop in the time between screens. These are among the reasons that regular screening is important.

Mammography may produce abnormal results, raising the suspicion of cancer, when, in fact, additional imaging or biopsies show that there is no cancer.  

Some breast cancers that appear on a mammogram may never progress to the point where a woman has symptoms during her lifetime. Therefore, some women may have surgery or treatment for a breast cancer that would never have been life-threatening.

Not all cancers found at screening can be treated successfully.

Bone Mineral Densitometry

The Bone Mineral Densitometry Unit is a safe, low-dose x-ray procedure that assists in diagnosing low bone density. This exam estimates the amount of bone mineral content in specific areas of the body, including the spine, hip and forearm.  Typically, a bone density test will last between 10-15 minutes. As we age, we naturally begin to lose bone density and this becomes more prevalent after age of 50. THE BMD Unit is used to diagnose osteoporosis, asses the risk of fracture and monitor changes in bone density over time. Osteoporosis occurs very gradually throughout life and leads to painful and crippling fractures of the hips, vertebrae and wrists. Over 25,000 hip fractures occur each year in Canada, with total health care costs exceeding $600 million. Both new and existing treatments offer hope for stabilizing bone mass and reducing fractures.   Osteoporosis is often known as “the silent thief” because bone loss occurs without symptoms. Osteoporosis is sometimes confused with osteoarthritis, because the names are similar. Osteoporosis is a bone disease; osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints and surrounding tissue.

If you are concerned about your bone density, are over 50 or have one of the risk factors, please speak with your family doctor about a Bone Mineral Densitometry Screening.  The Diagnostic Imaging Department is located on the ground floor of ADMH beside the gift shop.  Hours of operation are from 8am - 4pm Monday to Friday and they can be reached by phone at 613-623-3166 ext. 214

 

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